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Old 12-08-2009, 10:57 AM
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Default Curious Artwork

In the New York Times, Natalie Angier was reporting on an exhibit at the Guggenheim Museum by a Russian artist, Vasily Kandinsky. My knowledge of past or current artists is quite shallow. But as I looked at an example of his art that this author found singular, I couldn't help think how much more appealing I personally found the art that Dr Dahesh had selected. For anyone interested here is a link to the article: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/08/sc...=1&ref=science

Although the colors and patterns might be intriguing, I thought they were devoid of spiritual content. Now I know that even a brick is supposed to have spiritual fluids, but......

Last edited by Loup Solitaire; 12-11-2009 at 10:25 AM.
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Old 12-11-2009, 01:58 AM
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Let's assume that abstraction is key to organizing and representing information...

There are relationships established on the canvas by virtue of the fact you have different shapes, colors, connections and transitions.

Without acquiring this sort of language, an architect (for example) would find it difficult to (somehow) marry a myriad of information (including how each space is used, sizes, typography, climate... metaphors... structural and mechanical elements...) in order to generate some sort of initial vision for a dwelling... that would please a client.

That is why, for example, I studied Kandinsky's work. It was among the many examples I would use in the process of my learning things such as composition, and knowing where certain things need to go when certain other things — that were not there before — suddenly had to be "wedged" in there. Think "holistic"... in other words, "form AND function working TOGETHER, versus one following the other..."

Thus, this becomes about thinking abstractly when it comes to the "discipline" of visually representing information ... something we tend to (now) take for granted.

And if something can help me be a better anything, then it can't possible have nothing to offer in terms of a degree of "spirituality."
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Old 12-11-2009, 10:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Mario View Post
Let's assume that abstraction is key to organizing and representing information...

There are relationships established on the canvas by virtue of the fact you have different shapes, colors, connections and transitions.

Without acquiring this sort of language, an architect (for example) would find it difficult to (somehow) marry a myriad of information (including how each space is used, sizes, typography, climate... metaphors... structural and mechanical elements...) in order to generate some sort of initial vision for a dwelling... that would please a client.

That is why, for example, I studied Kandinsky's work. It was among the many examples I would use in the process of my learning things such as composition, and knowing where certain things need to go when certain other things — that were not there before — suddenly had to be "wedged" in there. Think "holistic"... in other words, "form AND function working TOGETHER, versus one following the other..."

Thus, this becomes about thinking abstractly when it comes to the "discipline" of visually representing information ... something we tend to (now) take for granted.

And if something can help me be a better anything, then it can't possible have nothing to offer in terms of a degree of "spirituality."
Well, as I said my knowledge of art is shallow. I appreciate your comment and I am impressed that you had actually studied his work. After reading your comments, I had to go back a review the art again. I realized that I find it easier to relate to art depicting live creatures and scenes of life more than static objects.

Now, the reviewer saw life in the painting, and since I was prompted, I could see it also. But to me a lamp made by human hands has more life than a set of shapes and colors spread across a page. However, I can appreciate the need for an artist to experiment with shapes, shading, color, etc. I don't think there is a great intellectual distance between an artist and an inventor.

More importantly, I shouldn't malign this great artist based upon a single painting. By searching the Internet, I was able to identify many beautiful paintings that although abstract, seemed to imply more life like scenes and were more to my taste.

http://images.google.com/images?sour...ed=0CBoQsAQwAA

If you review this link you can see many fine examples of his diverse paintings.
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Old 12-11-2009, 11:47 AM
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Thank you for the link (and the compliment).

Also, and to make things more interesting, I recommend looking into the history of "Russian Constructivism" and how it influenced the world of design-at-large.
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Last edited by Mario; 12-11-2009 at 12:01 PM.
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Old 12-11-2009, 02:17 PM
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Thank you for the link (and the compliment).

Also, and to make things more interesting, I recommend looking into the history of "Russian Constructivism" and how it influenced the world of design-at-large.
That link was scary. Kandinsky had more flare. I noticed he died December, the year I was born, 1944, in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France. In approximately 1921 he left Russia for Germany because the Soviet attitude toward art changed. Then in 1933, he moved to Paris. In 1939, he became a French citizen. I don't know if what follows is a sketch or photo of Kandinsky. An old photo I guess.

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Old 12-11-2009, 02:35 PM
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That link was scary. Kandinsky had more flare.
Scary and... "brutal."

Still... when you analyze some of the graphic design elements you'll see how much influence this visual vocabulary still exerts on contemporary visual communication — and lest we forget: the built environment.

Now, I will recommend you check out one of my favorite Constructivist Architects-Artists: Iakov Chernikhov.

Kandinsky was to Chernikhov what Chopin was to Beethoven (in my humble opinion).

Paintings.

Architectural and Machine Forms

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